Re: Intro.. #introductions

 

On Tue, Aug 4, 2015 at 12:54 am, 'Lil Crawford wrote:

Most physical community is built, in togetherness, by people whom may or may not fancy each other; whereas cyber-community is highly selective, thus heightening our fractured digital divide. Amongst most of us, ambition overrides morality.

 That is well put on both counts. The selectivity of online life has had challenging implications for media as well -- when your business model relies on amassing as many eyeballs as possible, and those eyeballs have more choices than ever about where to look (or look away from), there's even more pressure to polarize / sensationalize. At the same time there's even more risk and less potential reward for "speaking truth to power," and the journalist's historical role in keeping the public informed gets more difficult when it's insanely easy to filter out anything you don't want to hear (i.e. the sometimes difficult and challenging truth vs. appearance / perception of what's going on).

The ambition vs. morality dimension is something I think about all the time. We have a hard time conceptualizing beyond binary value judgments ("ambition is good!") when the truth is both far more complex and not nearly as objective as we like to imagine -- I've seen people torn apart by their own ambition; drive others around them into exhaustion (or away); or reach that point of potential corruption where the allure of end justifying the means can be almost irresistible. When you add peer pressure and cultural pressure to Succeed At All Costs to the mix, it's a recipe for abandoning morals in the name of "achievement," writ large. The more you achieve and the greater your ambition, the more likely it becomes that you'll run up against that moment when one must choose between doing the right thing and doing the successful thing that sacrifices something valuable and, perhaps, irrecoverable.

Reminder to self: choose wisely in every moment.

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